In the 17th century, going to Japan was liable to a death penalty!

15 décembre 2013 | Dans History, Politics, Rights
In the 17th century, going to Japan was liable to a death penalty!

Many of us are charmed by the Japanese culture and dream about visiting Japan someday.

Fortunately for us, we are allowed nowadays to go to Japan at any time, which we wouldn’t have been in the 17th century, because at that time, going to Japan was punishable by death. Indeed, no stranger could enter in Japan and no Japanese are allowed to leave the country lest face a death penalty.

This policy was adopted by the Tokugawa shogunate under Tokugawa Iemitsu (the third shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate who reigned from 1623 to 1651). The policy remained in effect until 1853 and it was only the arrival of the black ships of Commodore Matthew Perry that forced Japan to open its gates to Western trade.

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